Tag Archives: Dreger

“The Case for Hospital Births”

Best place to have a baby?

Here’s a kind of counterpoint article, also from The Atlantic,  to the one by Alice Dreger M.D. on low-intervention birth in my previous post. The author, Adam Wolfberg M.D., is an obstetrician at Tufts University who specializes in high risk pregnancies. Right from the article’s first sentence he’s pretty up front about where he thinks births should happen:

“I believe babies ought to be born in a hospital.”

That belief seems to be based on personal experience (I say “seems,” because the only case presented is of a couple who wanted a home birth, ran into trouble that led to transfer, and then were “annoyed” to have had a healthy baby in the hospital) and backed up by a reference to the study by J.R. Wax that purported to show a three-fold increase in infant mortality for babies born at home.

This essay actually offers unintended support to Dr. Dreger’s claim that physicians sometimes confuse science with technology. The Wax study has been heavily criticized for presenting a distorted picture of home birth safety  (details here). Dr. Wolfberg ignores much research to the contrary in picking that particular study as evidence of the dangers of out-of-hospital birth, and his use of a badly flawed study to support hospital birth for all women is exactly the kind of thing Dr. Dreger decries.

As I said in my last post, I’ve been on both sides of this debate. Childbirth is sometimes a scary thing, and it doesn’t always end happily. I’ve seen the kind of birth disasters that make an aggressive approach to childbirth so attractive to physicians, and I’ve also taken care of babies harmed by that style of practice.

The trick is to find a safe balance of nature and technology for each mother and baby. That’s an elusive goal in the increasingly polarized world of American maternity care.

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Filed under Cesareans, Home birth, Natural childbirth, Science