Pollution and birth weight

Beijing in January

Beijing in January

What with continuing air pollution woes in such diverse locales as Beijing and Salt Lake City,  a study released last week in Environmental Health Perspectives–which found a direct relationship between particulate air pollution and low birth weight in term babies–couldn’t be more timely.

The study’s authors compiled data on more than 3 million births in nine countries and found a 10-15% increased risk of low birth weight in the most polluted locations.

This isn’t just about turning out slightly less pudgy newborns. The consequences of low birth weight are far-reaching, even multi-generational. Low birth weight babies are more likely to develop chronic health conditions as they grow up, like heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes–just the sort of health problems that make for high-risk pregnancies a generation down the road.

In other words, today’s low birth weight baby girl is more likely to one day produce an unhealthy baby of her own. It’s a cycle that’s tough to break once it starts, and this study is more food for thought as world leaders (hopefully) get serious about addressing climate issues.

(Photo credit: jaaron)

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Filed under Environment/Toxins, Maternal-child health, Newborns

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