Brazilian women fight cesarean trends

Going natural in Rio?

More than half of all Brazilian children are born by cesarean section, making Brazil one of the most “sectioned” countries in the world. If you’re a woman lucky enough to have health insurance there, the chance of a surgical birth jumps even higher: 82%. In some private hospitals the rates are well into the 90s. Vaginal birth is about as rare as quadruplets in some areas.

A small anti-cesarean movement had begun in Brazil in recent years, but a tipping point was reached recently when a medical regulating agency in Rio de Janeiro banned doctors from performing home births, and–in a move that’s pretty hard to justify–banned doulas from accompanying women to hospitals.

That did it. Women–some marching bare-breasted, others with painted pregnant bellies–took to the streets as demonstrations against hyper-medicalized birth broke out in dozens of cities across the country.

That seems to have gotten the doctors’ attention:

“We need to have a serious discussion in this country to see what can be done to change this culture,” said Olimpio Moraes Filho, one of the head doctors with the Brazilian Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. “Women are starting to rebel, and they should.”

Ok, fine…time to discuss a problem that’s been out of hand for a few decades. But how did it get this way in the first place?

There are many threads to the issue, and all of them led to one common path: a medical culture that has turned normally progressing births into unnecessarily stressful, painful ordeals. To Brazilian women terrified of the rough examinations, inductions, forceps, episiotomies, and lack of labor support that often come with vaginal birth, cesareans can sounds like a pretty good deal. (Sounds a lot like the U.S. in the not-so-distant past, come to think of it.)

And Brazilian hospitals do their best to make sure the money-making surgery stays popular:

Safaris?

“Private clinics are often happy to make that dream come true by turning delivery into something akin to a weekend retreat in a birth-themed five-star hotel. At the Perinatal Clinic in Rio de Janeiro, mothers can get free hairstyling, manicures and makeup sessions, and for a fee, can have their rooms decorated in a safari or teddy bear motif. Once the new mom is ready for visitors, a catering service complete with waiters can also be arranged.”

Teddy bears? Waiters? Dang! I want a c-section, too!

The times appear to be a-changin’ for real. In the last year and a half the Brazilian government has put over a billion dollars into a program designed to “humanize” natural birth. Whether that will make a real dent in Brazil’s cesarean-saturated medical culture, though, remains to be seen…

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Filed under Cesareans, Natural childbirth

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